I had a big surge in traffic on my last blog post, Dear LSD. Thanks everybody who took the time to read it.

I’ve spent the last few years in deliberation on how to give an honest review of my experience with LSD. It was a huge paradigm shift , and I spent years without telling anybody (with the exception of a select few), due to fear and uncertainty. I was afraid of the stigma associated with taking drugs. I was afraid that people would make judgements about my set of values. I was afraid of whatever misconstrued beliefs people might make about my decisions.

I’ve spent plenty of time knowing that at some point, I would find the appropriate rhetoric, and a suitable platform to tell my story. I have that now.

My girlfriend at the time would remember me boring her (I knew from her expression) with these fantastical stories about how it looked, and how I felt. That was three years ago, and I could only manage to articulate the mundane aspects of what it’s like to take acid. I’m refering to what it looked like visually, sounded like, felt like, tasted like, and thought like.

Don’t get me wrong, those thing were beyond absurd and more than fantastic. Its those thing which I think people like to hear about.

When I began writing ‘Dear LSD’, I quickly realized that I’d be writing about the impact it had, and how my mind was different afterwards.

‘Dear LSD pt. 2’ will be about a time when I abused LSD. It will be about how I learned to use acid as a tool, and how I came to see it as a sacrament rather than a recreational drug

I feel responsible for saying that I don’t condone the use of drugs, neither do I advocate for the use of LSD. I can only speak in retrospection, so it would go against all of my human experience to say that I wish I never tried it. I already did try it, and it made me a better person. Understand that LSD made me better after it robbed me of my self esteem, my core beliefs, and a relatively healthy balance of mind. Keep that in mind.

Erik H.